Javascript er ikke aktivert i din nettleser. Dette er nødvendig for å bruke Oncolex. Kontakt din systemadministrator for å aktivere JavaScript.

Lymphedema


Medical editor Inger Lise Nesvold
Specialist in Physical Therapy
Oslo University Hospital
Norway

General

According to etiology, there are two general classifications of lymphedema primary and secondary lymphedema. Primary lymphedema is caused by deficient or faulty development of the lymph system. Secondary lymphedema occur as a complication from trauma or diseases which damage the lymphatic vessels or lymph nodes. The primary cause of lymphedema in the western world, is impaired or disrupted flow of lymph fluid caused by cancer or cancer treatment (secondary lymphedema).

Lymphedema occurs when the transport capacity of the lymph system is reduced significantly.
The swelling is caused by an accumulation of fluid (rich in protein) in the tissue, due to reduced drainage of lymph fluid (1,2). The swelling is often chronic. A lymphedema can lead to pain/discomfort and changes in the soft tissues in the affected area (fibrosis) (3,4). Lymphedema occurs most often during the first 2-3 years after cancer treatment (5 6). Without treatment, lymphedema can lead to progressive swelling.

In some cancer treatment the lymph nodes and fatty tissue are removed, most often in the axilla, pelvis and the groin. This treatment causes damage to the lymphatic wessels and reduces the number of lymph nodes. The subsequent reduced capacity for drainage of lymph fluid in the arm and leg may result in lymphedema.

Radiation therapy may cause tissue scarring and fibrosis. The combination of surgery and radiation therapy to the axilla additionally increases the risk of developing lymphedema.

Cancer related lymphedema can also occur due to metastasis in areas where blocking the central lymph vessels in advanced disease.

Factors which may increase the risk for developing lymphedema are:

  • obesity
  • infection in the area where lymphedema occurs
  • overheating/sunburn
  • trauma of the arm/leg on the operated side

Indications for treatment

Lymphedema in the arm/hand, breast, leg, groin, face and neck after treatment of:

  • breast cancer where axillary dissection is performed
  • gynecologic cancer where the lymph nodes in the pelvis or the groin are removed
  • melanoma where the lymph nodes in the axilla or the groin are removed
  • lymphoma and cancer of the head and neck region where lymph nodes in the neck region are removed
  • prostate cancer where the lymph nodes in the pelvis or the groin are removed
  • sarcoma where lymph nodes are removed

Without treatment the lymphedema can increase in size. This may cause skin changes (fibrosis), increased swelling and therefore more discomfort in the area (3).

Contraindications

Absolute
  • acute infections, local or general (erysipelas)
  • arterial insufficiency with risk of necrosis
  • thrombosis and embolism
Relative

Untreated cancer disease, heart failure, or kidney failure

Goal

  • reduce lymphedema
  • relieve tormenting side effects
  • improve function 
  • prevent complications such as skin changes and inflammation in the area (erysipelas)

References

1. Rockson SG. Diagnosis and management of lymphatic vascular disease. J Am Coll Cardiol 2008;52:799-806.
2. Lawenda BD, Mondry TE, Johnstone PAS. Lymphedema: (Review) A primer on the identification and management of a chronic condition in oncologic treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2009;59:8-24.
3. Mortimer PC. The patophysiology of lymphedema. Cancer 1998;83(12 Suppl American): 2798-802.
4. Erickson VS, Pearson ML, Ganz PA, Adams J, Kahn KL. Review: Arm edema in breast cancer patients. J Natl Cancer Inst 2001;93:96-111.
5. Nesvold IL, Dahl AA, Løkkevik E, Mengshoel AM, Fosså SD. Arm and shoulder morbidity in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy versus mastectomy. Acta Oncol 2008;47:835-842.
6. Norman SA, Russel Locario A, Potashnik SL, et al (2009) Lymphedema in breast cancer survivors: incidence, degree, time course, treatment, and symptoms. J Clin Oncol 2009;27:390-397.
7. Johansen J, Overgaard J, Blichert Toft M, Overgaard M. Treatment morbidity associated with the management of the axilla in breast-conserving therapy. Acta Oncol 2000;39:349-54


Definitions

Complete psysical therapy treatment of lymphedema

Consists of manual lymph drainage, compression therapy, skin care and instruction in exercises and self-treatment (1). The treatment is performed by physical therapists with special expertise.
The treatment may be extensive at the start. In cases of severe swelling one usually start with manual lymph drainage followed by bandaging of the arm/leg (1).

Manual Lymph Drainage

This is a kind of massage which requires guided training to perform optimally. The goal is to encourage the drainage of lymph fluid and thereby reduce the swelling of the tissue (2). It is quite different from other kinds of massage applied within physiotherapy. The anatomical conditions of the lymph system is the basis for manual lymph drainage. These are: the course of the large lymph veins, the borders of different lymphatic functional regions (watershed), natural anastomoses crossing these lines, and the lack of valves in the lymphatic vessels .

Bandaging

Bandaging is used mostly at the start of a treatment to reduce swelling. When the swelling is reduced a compression stocking is adjusted.

Compression stocking

Clinical experience and research show that compression is the most important treatment. (3;4) Accordingly it is of great importance to adjust a compression stocking for the arm or leg. If there is swelling of the hand, a compression glove might help.
A compression stocking is used to increase tissue tension. The pressure from the stocking increases absorption of tissue fluid. The stocking provides a graded pressure highest distally and lowest proximally. To adjust the stocking, the circumference of the arm or leg is measured at several defined points. There are several compression classes, but the most commonly used are class 1 and 2. The stocking should provide a constant pressure without causing discomfort. It may take some time to get used to the compression stocking. Some choose to use the stocking occasionally, while others wear it daily.
A facemask at night is recommended to treat lymphedema in the neck and face region (5). Patiens with lymphedema in the groin can be helped by using a bike pant or a panty. Bandaging, tubigrip or bike pants may benefit if there is swelling of the penis and scrotum .

Intermittent pressure massage with pulsation

Treatment is carried out with an electronically powered apparatus which blows air in a double-walled cuff. The cuff, covering the whole arm or leg, has multiple channels and creates a peristaltic pressure wave in proximal direction. The treatment encourages the lymph drainage and thereby reduces the swelling (4).

References

1. The diagnosis and treatment of peripheral lymphedema. Consensus document of the International Society of Lymphology Executive Committee. Lymphology 2003;36:84-91.
2. McNeely ML, Peddle CJ, Yurick JL, Dayes IS, Mackey JR. Conservative and dietary interventions for cancer-related lymphedema: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Cancer 2010.
3. Badger C, Preston N, Seers K, Mortimer P. Physical therapies for reducing and controlling lymphedema of the limbs. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2004;CD003141.
4. Johansson K, Albertsson M, Ingvar C, Ekdahl C. Effects of compression bandaging with or without manual lymph draining treatment in patients with postoperative arm lymphedema. Lymphology 1999;32:103-110.
5. Deng J, Ridner SH, Murphy BA. Lymphedema in patients with head and neck cancer. 2011;38:1-10.

                                                                          


Preparation

Main points of information

Information should be given to patients who have received surgery only or combined with radiotherapy with increased risk of getting lymphedema. The patient usually gets information about lymphedema after the surgery. Sufficient information and guidance is important and crucial for both avoiding getting lymphedema and being able to identify lymphedema at the very beginning.

  • The function and purpose of the lymphatic system
  • Causes of lymphedema
  • Symptoms of lymphedema
  • Different treatment options
  • Precaution
  • Complications/side effects caused by the disease and treatment
  • The importance of maintaining mobility in the arm or leg

Symptoms of lymphedema

  • A feeling of uncomfortable change
  • A feeling of heaviness
  • Bursting pain
  • Changes of consistency (visible or palpable) in the soft tissues
  • Suspicion of increased circumference
  • Swelling may disappear overnight, but usually returns during daytime
  • Some have swelling sporadically

The dominating symptom is lasting swelling in the involved area. Other symptoms will to a large extent depend on the amount, duration, and localization of the edema.

Moderate swelling after cancer surgery, can be a reaction which often spontaneously disappears.

Diagnostics

Lymphedema is usually measured using a clinical method. There are multiple methods to measure the extent of lymphedema. The gold standard is the water displacement method, which measures and compares the volumes of both arms/legs. But a method of comparing volume by using several circumferential measurements of the arms/legs is often used in research and sometimes in the clinical setting. The most widely used method is measurement of circumference at multiple anatomic points on the arm/leg with comparison with the contralateral arm/leg. A difference in circumference of ≥2cm is often defined as lymphedema. Stemmer sign is also used.


Implementation

With development of lymphedema, it is important to take precautionary measures as soon as possible. Treatment with compression is the component which seems to be most effective in reducing the swelling. Manual lymph drainage is often used in combination with bandaging in the first 1-2 weeks of the treatment. This complete decongestive therapy is a composite treatment including multiple techniques which are performed by a specially trained physical therapist.

The intensive phase

  • Compression treatment – possibly with bandaging and thereafter adjustment of an elastic stocking
  • Manual lymph drainage
  • Circulation and drainage inducing exercises
  • Skin care

During the intensive phase, the patient is usually treated 5 days a week with continuously bandaging until the desired volume reduction is achieved. This usually takes one to two weeks.

Bandaging

After stimulating the lymphatic flow by manual lymph drainage, a compression stocking is used or the whole arm is bandaged for one to two weeks. The bandages should be worn as long as they are not too uncomfortable. Correct bandaging with short, elastic bandages provide the tissue with high pressure under activity and low pressure while resting.

  • An ointment with a low pH (5.5) should be applied to the skin.
  • A light tube gauze should be worn.
  • The padding is then applied.
  • The bandaging starts distally to the lymphedema.
  • The bandages are laid evenly, circularly, and in multiple layers.
  • The pressure should decrease gradually from distal to proximal.
  • The pressure is regulated partially with the bandaging technique and mainly by the number of layers of bandages.

Compression stocking

  • The stocking may be removed at night.
  • At night an ointment is preferably applied to the skin.
  • With incipient  lymph edema, wear the stocking during activity.
  • In moderate and extensive lymph edema, the stocking is usually worn all day.
  • The stocking should be washed at least every third day.

A poorly customized stocking may create faulty compression. The most frequent error is that the compression stocking is used after it has lost its elasticity (worn out) and therefore has less effect.

Manual Lymph Drainage

The massage strokes should be performed in the direction of the lymphatic drainage with light pressure and with slow motions. The treatment should not be painful.

Manual lymph drainage has four main movements: standing circles, pumping grip, turning grip, and corkscrew grip.

Pressure massage with pulsator

Pulsation is never a first choice for treatment of lymphedema, but could be a measure over time when monitoring has shown that the treatment is effective. At the start, the patient should be informed about possibly complications. Sometimes, an increase in edema is seen proximal to the cuff. Further pulsation treatment should then be postponed until manual lymph drainage and exercises have improved the condition. If the pressure is too high, the lymphatic vessels may be damaged and the amount of interstitial fluid may increase.
The pressure should be moderate and the patient should experience the treatment as comfortable. It is not the amount of pressure that is important, but uniform rhythmic pressure wave. Tuning of rate and pressure are adjusted for each patient.
Usually, the treatment should last for twenty minutes at the start increasing gradually to thirty to forty minutes. Can be used daily or when needed. Pulsation treatment may also be performed by the patient at home.

Skin Care

Regardless of whether the patient has lymphedema or not, it is important to hinder the occurrence of scratches, sores, and unnecessary skin irritation. Use of gloves is appropriate in some situations. The patient should also be cautious of overheating and sunburn. The main goal of skin care is to prevent infections, because this can trigger an eruption of lymph edema.

Regular use of bandages and compression stockings dries out the skin. Use of skin care products and cleansers with a low pH (5.5) are recommended. Good skin care keeps the skin soft and supple and maintains the skins natural ability to fight infection.

Disinfecting ointment and adhesive tape should be used in the event of an ulcer or scratch or if there is danger of infection.

Maintenance phase

  • Use of elastic stocking and/or glove as needed
  • Skin care
  • Regular exercises to facilitate the muscle-joint pump
  • Possible intermittent pressure massage with pulsator

The patient obtains some treatment during the maintenance phase and may have treatment by a physical therapist if necessary. In the short term, the treatment is almost always satisfactory. In the long run, the result depends on the patient practicing the measures recommended. The pulsator may usually be borrowed from a health care center.

Exercises to improve mobility and lymph flow of the shoulder/arm

Dynamic exercises with a relaxation phase are optimal. "Throwing" movements may feel uncomfortable. Many experience that it is better to walk with poles, but it is important to maintain a loose grip of the pole.

Correctly adjusted movement exercises:

  • induce circulation without straining the reduced lymphatic system
  • provide adequate joint movements
  • stimulate dynamic change between tension and relaxation, preferably in conjunction with respiration

Movement therapy in a heated pool may be favorable for some lymphedema patients. Water pressure stimulates lymphatic drainage and simultaneously activates circulation and movement.

 


Follow-Up

If necessary, the patient may obtain a referral for physical therapy in their home area for further follow-up. Follow-up and guidance by a physical therapist with the necessary skills is important. Some with serious lymphedema will need frequent treatment for the rest of their life. But others will be able to manage the treatment themselves by adhering to the guidelines that they have learned. Compression with stockings and skincare are often sufficient treatment. So many patients do not need physical therapy as treatment, but rather information and functional guidance.

Moderate physical activity improves joint movement, circulation, and well-being, as well as stimulation of lymph drainage. Blood pressure should not be measured and vaccinations should not be given in the treated arm. Gloves are recommended for gardening.

Complications

Fibrosis of the dermis and epidermis with affects some persons with lymphedema. The skin loses its elasticity and is more easily traumatized than normal skin.

The immune system is weakened in the edematous area. This may be for multiple reasons, among others, weakened transport of dendritic cells, lymphocytes, and proteins. If the area’s regional lymph nodes are removed, this will also weaken the local immune system.

In some edema patients, especially secondary lymphedema, a distinctive reaction (erysipelas) may occur in the skin of the affected area. This will usually start acutely with a strong feeling of malaise with high fever, hyperemia with flushing, and increased swelling of the skin. The area of skin involvement is often limited. The symptoms are usually improved after four to six days but it is not uncommon for the edema to deteriorate. The condition should be treated with antibiotics (penicilin) as quickly as possible.


Oslo University Hospital shall not be liable for any loss whether direct, indirect, incidental or consequential, arising out of access to, use of, or reliance upon any of the content on this website. Oslo University Hospital© 2017